South Central Arc User Group


Established 1990

 

 

 

2015 OKSCAUG Poster Presentations

 


To submit an abstract please visit the following page:  Posters and Presentations Submission
 

Title:
Columbus’ Four Voyages: A Detailed Look

Presenter:
Jason Kleps

Organization:
Meshek & Associates, PLC

Abstract:
This poster takes a day by day look at each of Christopher Columbus’ four voyages to the New World. Data was created by referencing both Columbus’ own log (“The Four Voyages: Being His Own Log-Book, Letters and Dispatches with Connecting Narratives”; Penguin Classics; ISBN 0140442170) as well as Samuel Eliot Morison’s magisterial history of the explorer (“Admiral of the Ocean Sea: A Life of Christopher Columbus”; Little, Brown, and Company; ISBN 0316584789). Additional layers such as archaic place names and original tribal boundaries provide supporting context to the voyages themselves. With this poster I hope to generate increased interest in Historical GIS.


Title:
Mapping Utilities on a Budget

Presenter:
Rhonda Baber & Larry Setters & Michael Richardson?

Organization:
Tahlequah Public Works Authority

Abstract:
Tahlequah OK is a community in Cherokee County of approximately 16,000 people. Tahlequah Public Works Authority provides Water, Sanitary Sewer, and Electric utilities to its approximately 8,000 customers. Prior to 2012, the last updated map or atlas of the city’s utility system had taken place in 1986. The system was badly in need of updating, so TPWA hired two mapping technicians. Since that time, we have done field verification of our entire system, including water lines, valves, meters and fire hydrants, sanitary sewer lines and manholes, and overhead and underground electric services. We then created poster maps and atlas books for our service crews to have in the field. We are in the planning process of obtaining mobile devices for our service crews, which will require our maps.


Title:
All the right data in All the Right Places: Basics of Coordinate Systems and Projections

Presenter:
Marcus Arreguin

Organization:
Rogers County Assessor's Office

Abstract:
Handling coordinate systems and projections properly is a crucial part of creating accurate and aesthetically pleasing maps. However, many GIS users have a rudimentary understanding at best of the basics of this. The presenter will cover the basics of datums, coordinate systems, and projections in an accessible manner. He will also discuss some rules of thumb when handling coordinate systems and projections, mention how to avoid common pitfalls, and show examples of how to set up projections in ArcGIS.

Title:
Using Lidar and the National Land Cover Database to Reveal Urban Abandonment in Detroit

Presenter:
Emily S. Thompson & Kirsten de Beurs

Organization:
Department Geography and Environmental Sustainability, The University of Oklahoma

Abstract:
The urban population in the United States increased by 12.1% from 2000 to 2010, but this change is not uniform for all urban areas. While many studies are devoted to changing urban land cover patterns as a result of population growth, this study specifically investigates the changes of a shrinking city. Detroit reduced from a peak population exceeding 1.8 million in 1950 to 714 thousand in 2010, a decline of 61.4%. Between 2000 and 2010, Detroit shrank by 24% from 951 thousand to 714 thousand people. This study uses the ArcGIS software to investigate the relationship between percent population change and land cover changes experienced by the Detroit Metropolitan region between 2001 and 2011. For this study, I use the 2001 and 2011 National Land Cover Dataset’s Land Cover, Percent Impervious Surface, Percent Tree Canopy and Lidar data. I also use the 2000 and 2010 US Census Bureau population data.

Title:
Oklahoma Biological Information System

Presenter:
Bruce Hoagland & Dan Hough & Todd Fagin

Organization:
Oklahoma Biological Survey

Abstract:
Informed and accurate conservation planning relies on access to current, spatially explicit data on the occurrence of species. In Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Natural Heritage Inventory (ONHI), a program of the Oklahoma Biological Survey (OBS), is the designated centralized repository for biodiversity data. The OBS enabling legislation requires ONHI to “acquire, archive, process and disseminate information on biological resources and natural areas that is or could be of value to policy and decision makers in the state (§70 3314).”  To achieve this mandate, the OBS and ONHI maintain a collection of databases related to the biodiversity of Oklahoma. These data are provided to interested state and federal agencies, NGOs, consulting firms, and the public. However, these databases offer different degrees of accessibility and functionality. In order to overcome these limitations, OBS staff, in conjunction with staff from the University of Oklahoma Information Technology Department, is now working to integrate these disparate databases into a single, integrated, web-based data management system, tentatively called the Oklahoma Biological Information System (OBIS). This poster is designed to give an overview of this ongoing development project.

Title:
Mapping New Orleans Flood Risk Using LiDAR Data

Presenter:
Kyndra Hanson & Chloe Magee

Organization:
Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma

Abstract:
Coastal cities are especially vulnerable to storm surge and flooding from a tropical cyclone. In particular, New Orleans, Louisiana presents a unique example due to the city’s vulnerable location between Lake Pontchartrain to the North and the drainage of the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, the city’s elevation rests lower than the majority of the state - even below sea level in multiple areas. By conducting a comparative analysis of New Orleans’ pre-hurricane geography to post-storm devastation, problematic areas in the land can be identified for future mitigation. LiDAR data provides a digital perspective of the coastline for an interdisciplinary analysis of population density variation, elevation and geographic features. The proximity of each of these features to one another will indicate the types of vulnerability experienced in New Orleans.  A flood inundation map was created using land cover classification and a digital elevation model. Moving forward, mitigation techniques will be suggested based on findings with emphasis on the understanding of susceptibility to risks based on geographic location.

Title:
Utility Data Management and Mapping in the Noble Foundation

Presenter:
Kushendra N. Shah

Organization:
The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Inc.

Abstract:
Migration of CAD based utility data and drawings into enterprise GIS is important in many ways for mapping of assets, outage response, field survey and tracking, and updates and distribution. GIS system and capabilities offer maximum advantage for organizing and managing data in effectively and timely fashion. Spatial Technology Services at Noble Foundation brought all the historical CAD files to facilitate Noble Foundation’s Facility Department into GIS system. At first, the geo-data development and model were created in order to perform versioned edits on the databases for specific users. This helps to manage, organize, and keep tracks of any updates that has been newly added from the field. The data were then attributed with pertinent information and geometrically corrected in order to enhance better accuracy and preserve spatial information. In addition, quality control and assurance was done on the data using Esri’s ArcGIS data reviewer tool that helps to set procedures and standard to review, correct, and validate the data. The data were further published as GIS services in ArcGIS for Server to create and deploy web applications in ArcGIS for Windows Mobile for field data collection, updates, and synchronization.

Title:
Using GIS to Honor America’s Veterans

Presenter:
Jacob Shipman

Organization:
Meshek & Associates, PLC

Abstract:
Every Memorial Day volunteers across the country place flags on the graves of American veterans. With the help of GIS this daunting task can be made easier. Using ArcGIS Online and the ArcGIS Collector App I was able to collect GPS points of veterans buried in the Bixby Cemetery. After the data is processed it will be added to a web map for the city and public to access. Once the public has access to this data, volunteers will easily be able to find gravesites of veterans in Bixby Cemetery. This will reduce the time volunteers spend searching for graves, and increase the number of flags that can be placed by the volunteers.

Title:
Flood Database for Oklahoma: A web-Mapping Application for Historical Flood Information Organization and Access

Presenter:
S. Jerrod Smith

Organization:
U.S. Geological Survey

Abstract:
Historical peak-streamflow and peak-stage (flood) information is vital for the design of stream-related infrastructure such as bridges and dams. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) annually publishes these data from gaged sites, and the Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) conducts peak-stage surveys at selected sites during periods of flooding. This historical flood information often is underutilized because of a lack of knowledge of the existence, location, and usefulness of archived records. In cooperation with the ODOT, the USGS developed (1) a digital database of historical flood information, and (2) a web-based mapping application interface to facilitate access to this valuable information.

Data records in the Flood Database for Oklahoma were organized using a two-table, one-to-many, site-has-events database schema. Sites were georeferenced to an accuracy of at least 1,000 feet and attributed using standardized datasets including the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), the National Bridge Inventory (NBI), and U.S. Census Bureau political boundaries. Event records include hyperlinked references to original data sources, which were digitized as necessary. At last update (2013), the Flood Database for Oklahoma contained flood information from 1891 to 2013 for 22,377 events at 3,676 sites; following statewide and historic flooding in May–July 2015, the next update (2015) is expected to add many records to the database.

The web-mapping application includes simple tools for spatial and attribute queries and a tool for exporting selected data in a non-proprietary format. Selected photos and newspaper clippings also are available for download from the web-mapping application. The Flood Database for Oklahoma will support structural design near waterways and improve understanding of floods by providing engineers and scientists with simplified digital access to previously obscure or unavailable historical flood information.

Title:
Oklahoma Wind Energy

Presenter:
Dawn M Sowinski, GISP

Organization:
Meshek & Associates, PLC

Abstract:
Oklahoma’s energy production is primarily composed of petroleum and natural gas. Coal, hydroelectric power and wind energy, among others, also share in energy production. The purpose of this poster is to provide information on the existing state of wind power in Oklahoma, and to emphasize the potential for future development based on geographic factors.

Title:
Spatial Analysis of Opioid Mortality and EMS Administration of Naloxone in Oklahoma

Presenter:
J.L. Gilpen, MS, NREMT-I ((& K.E. Stewart, PhD & M.Q. Lansdale, MPH & Y. Wan, PhD))

Organization:
Emergency Systems, Oklahoma State Department of Health, OKC, Oklahoma

Abstract:
Objective:
Identify high-risk areas of opiate overdose using GIS to compare opiate-related overdose mortality data and EMS naloxone administration data.
Background:
On 06/14/2014 House Bill 1782 took effect providing statutory revisions to Administration of opiate antagonists (§ 63-1-2506.1) allowing all first responders to administer naloxone.
Methodology:
Patient-level data from the Oklahoma EMS Information System and vital statistics death data were used in conjunction with GIS techniques and spatial scan statistics to generate risk maps for areas with lower-than-expected naloxone use.
Results:
Between 01/01/2011 and 06/03/2014, 13,064 instances of naloxone administration were reported. Four clusters of statistically significant, higher-than-expected naloxone administration were identified (1.01<RR<9.0, P=.001). Analysis revealed 19 clusters of lower-than-expected naloxone administration. The clusters of lower-than-expected usage correlated with basic and intermediate licensed EMS agencies. 
Conclusion:
Analysis of spatial risk distribution may be useful identifying EMS agencies that would benefit from the Naloxone Training and Administration for EMS Personnel Program.

Title:
Helping Emergency Services Help Others - GIS in Public Safety

Presenter:
Kathy H. Spivey

Organization:
City of Midwest City

Abstract:
GIS at Midwest City has developed a wide range of tools to support all of the City's Emergency Services departments - with their day-to-day operations and emergency response activities. This poster highlights the range of data and applications, desktop to mobile, created specifically for the Midwest City Police Department, Fire Department and Emergency Operations Center for daily use as well as for use during a crisis. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



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